Chief Residents

Michael Lavelle, MD.

Chief Medical Resident, Department of Medicine, New York Presbyterian Hospital - Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Growing up on Long Island, NYC was never more than an hour away. That all changed when I moved away from home for college and medical school. Nestled just two miles north of Albany in Loudonville, NY, I started my journey in the combined degree program at Siena College. After completing a major in Biology and minor in Spanish, I moved down the road to Albany Medical College where I began my medical training. When looking for a residency program, it was important to find a program that would provide me unparalleled clinical training with a diverse patient population in a nurturing learning environment. I found all that and more at Columbia. I have been able to take care of patients from all over the globe with varying levels of illness. Just as important as the patients we care for, the relationships I’ve made with my co-residents have created friendships that will last a lifetime. The thing that has impressed me the most about Columbia is the amazing group of residents I have trained with who constantly inspire me to be the best doctor I can be. After my Chief year, I plan to pursue fellowship in Cardiology with a career in academic medicine. When I’m not at work I enjoy spending time with my family, going to the beach and rooting for Mets!  

Heidi Lumish, M.D.

Chief Medical Resident, Department of Medicine, New York Presbyterian Hospital - Columbia University Irving Medical Center

I was born and raised in Westchester County and consider myself a New Yorker at heart. I left New York to attend college at Tufts University, where I majored in Community Health and Biology. I stayed in Boston for two more years to work in clinical research in cardiac imaging before returning to New York to attend medical school at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. I chose to stay at Columbia for residency because of the incredible camaraderie I sensed among the residents, the diverse patient population, and the opportunity to gain independence in managing complex patients, and I have not been disappointed. Columbia has now been my home for the past 7 years, and I have made life-long friends and colleagues who I have had the privilege to learn from every day. After my Chief year, I plan to pursue fellowship training in Cardiology and a career in academic medicine. When I am not at the hospital I love running (I ran 2 half marathons during residency!), hiking, cooking and baking, and exploring the city.

Daniel Manson, MD

Chief Medical Resident, Department of Medicine, New York Presbyterian Hospital - Columbia University Irving Medical Center

I was born in New York City and lived in Washington Heights until the ripe age of 2 years old before moving to the suburbs in Westchester. I grew up in a town called Hastings-on-Hudson where I went to elementary, middle, and high school. I then moved to Philadelphia where I attended the University of Pennsylvania for undergrad, majoring in both Political Science and the Biological Basis of Behavior. After a few too many cheesesteaks, I then traveled back home to my favorite city in the world, New York, where I attended medical school at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. I loved my time in medical school at Columbia and when it came to looking for a residency program, I had a feeling I wouldn’t have to look far. I knew I was looking for a program with a diverse and underserved patient population, a pervasive culture prioritizing resident education, and a culture of graded autonomy. I could not be happier that I decided to stay at Columbia. I’ve made some of the best friends of my life here and am constantly impressed by the compassion, dedication, enthusiasm, energy, and hilarity of our co-residents. I plan to apply to fellowship in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine with an intended career as a Clinician Educator. In my free time, I love to read, explore new restaurants, order takeout from new restaurants, and wander around Central Park.

Sherry Shen, MD.

Chief Medical Resident, Department of Medicine, New York Presbyterian Hospital - Columbia University Irving Medical Center

I was born and raised in the great mitten state of Michigan, where I stayed for undergrad at the University of Michigan and double majored in Cellular & Molecular Biology and Spanish. After college, I moved out here to New York City to attend medical school at Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons. When it came time to apply for residency, I was looking for a program with fantastic clinical training, plenty of research opportunities, and whose residents are actually friends outside of work. I was thrilled to match here for residency, where I've had the opportunity to care for an incredibly diverse, underserved patient population both longitudinally in my outpatient practice and more acutely in the inpatient setting. I am tremendously grateful for all that I've learned in these past three years from my brilliant colleagues, fellows, and attendings. I am applying for fellowship this year in Hematology/Oncology and plan to pursue a career in research and academic medicine. In my free time, I love to travel, try new restaurants around the city, and picnic in Central Park.

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From Our Residents

Residency at Columbia has given me the opportunity to be part of a system that welcomes diversity and quickly makes you feel at home. It has certainly been a privilege to work in a setting that fosters underserved communities and mediates exposure to treat a wide array of disease in a challenging learning environment driven towards growth as well-rounded physicians while providing high quality patient care.

- Dennis De León, MD 

  PGY2

  University of Puerto Rico 

National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) 

http://www.nrmp.org

NRMP Match Number: 

1495140C0

Contact Us 

MedResApplicant@cumc.columbia.edu

Photography:

Eileen Barroso

David Chong MD

Adam Faye MD

Anna Krigel MD

Rebecca Lock

Web design: 

I. Obi Emeruwa MD MBA

Vilma C. Luciano-Colon

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